logo4 Evolution is progress—                          
progress is creativity.        
vline

Inheritance - Heritage

view wiki view wiki view wiki view wiki

This article tackles the differences between fauceir inheritance and heritage. For definition of these terms, please see specific articles.

In both cases we deal with a fauceir that consists of memorizing slave fauceirs. The only diference is the perspective from which the process is analyzed.

  • Inheritance applies to similar slave fauceirs under the same master fauceir. A typical instance is a population as a master fauceir in which a member (slave) inherits to its children that are also slave fauceirs of the same master.
  • Heritage adapts the perspective of a master fauceir whose slaves carry some memory.
  • In other words heritage is the memory stored in a master fauceir while inheritance is information transfer among slaves (see figure below).
  • In biology inheritance is often seen in connection with the creation of a new individual. This however is not even compulsory even in biology, remember horizontal gene transfer, and becomes even less prominent on the ecological level, for instance when an ant colony is occupied by a new queen. Inheritance even less rarely involves new individuals at the social level.
  • Though the difference between inheritance and heritage is clear cut from the theoretical perspective it can change with the focus of research. While information is inherited from one idividual to an other in a population it becomes heritage in that new individual.

Orange Master, green slaves, red memory containing (cyan) inheritance (left) and heritage (right).

The picture illustrates the differences between inheritance the red fauceir in the left panel and heritage the red fauceir in the right panel. Both of them contain memory fauceirs (cyan). In a given master fauceir (orange) the inheritance is transferred from one slave to an other while heritage is a substantial element of a given master that effects other slave fauceirs.


Tags: Control Core theory Theory


Categories: Systems Theory

 
   

(c) Mato Nagel, Weißwasser 2004-2013, Disclaimer